Mar 23, 2022

50 Foods that Replenish Electrolytes

50 Foods that Replenish Electrolytes

Electrolytes are minerals that are essential for cells, and therefore bodies, to work optimally. Processed foods have few electrolyte minerals, and worse, often deplete them through digestion! Because electrolytes are so critical, it’s important to focus on foods that have these minerals in them. Another reason to avoid processed foods is that they contain virtually no useful electrolyte minerals. In addition, even if they don't taste salty, many frozen and restaurant meals are heavy in sodium, which can upset your electrolyte balance. In addition to depleting electrolytes, drinking too much alcohol can cause dehydration. What foods have high levels of electrolytes in them? Keep reading to find out!

Potassium

Extracellular fluid, such as blood, contains lower quantities of this ion than do cells. The Sodium-Potassium Pump in cell membranes, which drives numerous cellular activities, is coupled with potassium in several ways. Muscles use potassium to contract, and it helps to balance blood pressure as well.
  • Salmon
  • Chicken
  • Almonds
  • Tomatoes
  • Greens (spinach, kale)
  • Yogurt
  • Oranges
  • Avocadoes
  • Potatoes

Magnesium

There are approximately 300 enzymatic activities that utilize magnesium, making it just as important as the other electrolytes when it comes to neuron and muscle function. A good night's sleep and healthy bone growth are dependent on a good night's rest. In order for muscle fibers to contract and relax, they need magnesium. It's possible that you'll require more of this mineral if your week has been very stressful.
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Beans
  • Peanut butter
  • Salmon
  • Beef
  • Greens (spinach, chard)
  • Dark chocolate
  • Milk and yogurt
  • Oatmeal

Calcium

In order to maintain strong bones and teeth, calcium is essential, but that's not the only benefit! Many enzymes require calcium as a cofactor to function properly, including metabolic processes, blood clotting, and the regulation of heart rhythm. Calcium in bones and teeth is not electrically charged, in contrast to the calcium found in blood and other bodily fluids.
  • Yogurt
  • Cheese
  • Milk
  • Sardines
  • Almonds
  • Edamame
  • Leafy greens
  • Fortified plant-based milks

Sodium

In the body, this is the most abundant positively charged ion. Because of this, it is required in greater quantities than the other minerals. There are several functions of sodium in the nervous and muscular systems, including the heartbeat. Cellular ATP production is further aided by its ability to regulate body temperature and thirst.
  • Table salt
  • Packaged foods
  • Cottage cheese
  • Carrots
  • Tomatoes
  • Celery
  • Brown rice
  • Almonds

Chloride

Table salt is a common source of this mineral. Chloride is the most prevalent negatively charged ion in the body because sodium is the most prevalent positively charged ion. A healthy pH balance of bodily fluids and an efficient exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide are all supported by chloride.
  • Table salt
  • Soy sauce
  • Processed meats
  • Cheese
  • Canned fish
  • Tomatoes
  • Olives
  • Seaweed

Phosphate

Despite its obscurity, this electrolyte element is just as vital as the others. It works with calcium to create bones and teeth, and it is crucial to the creation of cellular energy. When phosphorus is not coupled to oxygen, it is known as phosphorus alone. Our DNA and cell membranes are made up of phosphate, which is a vital component of our bodies.
  • Cheese
  • Chicken
  • Beef
  • Lentils
  • Seafood
  • Dairy
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Whole grains
Remember to seek out foods that are as close to nature as possible to avoid excess processing, which removes nutrients including the electrolyte minerals. If you have local vendors that sell organic foods, even better! Organic farms tend to be more mindful of their soil health. If there are more minerals in the soil, they can be taken up by plants that will make a more nutrient dense meal for you!
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